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Tag Archives: teeth

I’m used to seeing tons of turtles in Hawaii, so many that I sometimes get a little jaded.  But boy, I’d forgotten how many eels hang out there.  Here’s a sampling.

A traditional up close shot of a moray.  There are lots of these guys out there.  Some quite large.

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Dive site: Molokini – Reef’s End.  OMD EM5, 12-50mm at 40mm.  1/250th, f/6.3, ISO 200

And here, getting cleaned by some pretty red shrimp.  The eel had to really open its mouth wide to allow those (really big) shrimp to get inside.  (Sorry, I was watching the action instead of shooting.)

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Dive site: Maui – Red Hill. OMD EM5, 12-50mm at 22mm. 1/250th, f/8.0, ISO 200

And a beautiful snowflake eel that I found out free swimming. Here posing with a sea urchin.

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Dive site: Maui – Red Hill. OMD EM5, 12-50mm at 34mm. 1/250th, f/8.0, ISO 200

And there were more.  A super shy dragon moray that I just couldn’t get a good shot of.  Lots more big morays.  If you like eels, this is a good spot.

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The shot I posted yesterday was a little out of order. Here’s one from my actual first day of diving.
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And what a first day. I’d been out of the water for a little while (since Palau), but we jumped right into the deep end. First day was 3 dives instead of my usual 2 for this trip. And the first dive was right at 130 feet to start. My dive computer is “severely conservative” if you’ll allow me to borrow a term of art from a different context.  And that meant that things were going to be a little challenging with a second fairly deep dive (though not anything like the first one).  And then a third to boot.  Yes, I ended up with a couple of minutes of deco.  This shot is from that third dive back along the Maui coast after the first two dives out at Molokini.

Snowflake Moray Eel, I think.

Dive site: Maui – near Wailea.

Shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 12-50 at 50mm f/6.3, 1/250th, ISO 200.

And for all gear obsessed photographers, check out the entries attributed to “Guest Photographer” here.  Invariably they’re made with the lowest end Nikon DSLR and a superzoom travel lens.  And by a kid.  A kid channeling their inner David duChemin.  Seeing is key.  Oh, and shooting a crazy number of frames to catch the action.

That’s motion blur on the teeth.  Hyraxes may be small, but they chomp quickly.

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Cape of Good Hope, South Africa.

Guest photographer.  Nikon D3100 Tamron 18-270 @ 270mm f/6.3

What, you only see a small rabbit sized animal?  Something that looks like a rodent.  No trunk.  No tusks.

Ok, well, you’re right — there is no elephant in the picture.  But there is a hyrax.  And the hyrax’s closest relative is the elephant.  Seriously.  Turns out their toenails are similar.

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Cape of Good Hope, South Africa.

Olympus OMD EM5, Lumix 20mm @ f/2.8.