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Tag Archives: fish

I believe he is saying “go away.”

These guys are shy and really don’t like you to come up to see them.  Normally they’re sitting right in the coral.  And in the picture they look pretty obvious with all those dark red spots.  But in the water, they’re actually pretty well camouflaged against the spots of the coral.

If you get too close, the swim away.  So, I was happy to get this shot.
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Dive site: Maui Five Graves/Five Caves/Five Names.

Shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 12-50 at 50mm f/8, 1/250th, ISO 200.

Ok, no skiing.  When it is cold and snowy up in the mountains, that seems to me like a great time to head to the ocean.  So, pardon the interruption — there’s more Palau to post, but here are a few in real(ish) time.

I’ve always been told that diagonals make for strong compositions. So this one’s great, right?
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Ok, kidding.

Found a nice coral whip with a goby.  Next time, I’ll try it with the CMC to get even tighter.

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Dive site: Maui – Molokini Back Wall.

Shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 12-50 at 50mm f/8.0, 1/250th, ISO 200.

Day 4 of the Wetpixel Whale Shark trip.  (Yes, if you’re keeping score, there’s no day 3 yet.  When I get those shots processed, I’ll do a day 3 out of sequence.)

Each day we’ve tried to get up just a little earlier to be early out to see the sharks before lots of others get there.  But maybe we should have told the sharks we were coming early.  Because despite leaving extra early this morning, we spent a while looking for sharks.  We saw lots of flying fish.  But no sharks.  But then right as I was thinking, gee, what could we do for a plan B, the radio crackled with news that someone else had spotted sharks.  So off we went for what turned out to be another great shark encounter including one super stealthy one that snuck up on me from the back.

I definitely shot more today, but wasn’t as dialed in as before.  But I did get a few I liked.

Here’s Christian Dimitrius, Emmy Award winning wildlife cinematographer and photographer, finning hard to get the shot of the whale shark. I am jealous of his free diving fins. And even more jealous of his stamina.
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1/125, f/6.3, ISO 640

The whale sharks typically carry multiple remora.  And honestly, I don’t understand why the remora hang out with the whale sharks.  I’ve always thought that remora eat up the scraps that bigger fish and sharks leave behind.  But whale sharks don’t shred up other things and leave pieces behind.  They’re filter feeders eating bonito eggs (think the size of the orange tobiko at your favorite sushi place) and other tiny stuff.  Maybe the remora are just along for the ride?

I even saw a remora in the nostril like hole behind the eye one one whale shark and on another 2 remoras on the sides of the shark’s mouth, like dimples.

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1/125, f/8, ISO 640

And here’s one getting that big mouth up to the surface to suck down the eggs floating on the top.
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1/125, f/8, ISO 640

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1/125, f/8, ISO 640

Big, big mouth.
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1/250, f/9, ISO 640

And here’s one wearing a sargasso barrette.
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1/320, f/8, ISO 640

Snorkel site: 20 miles offshore from Isla Mujeres, Mexico

All shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 8mm Panasonic fisheye lens in Nauticam housing and mini dome port, no strobes.

 

Day 2 of the Wetpixel Whale Shark trip.  And even better than day 1.  Sometimes less is more.  This is not one of those times.  And today there were lots more sharks.

First swim of the day. First shot.

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If you were this big and you only ate tiny little things like itty bitty fish eggs, you’d probably sail around with your mouth open all day too. Like these guys:

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Snorkel site: 20 miles offshore from Isla Mujeres, Mexico

All shot at 1/320th at f/5.6 with Olympus OMD EM5, 8mm Panasonic fisheye lens in Nauticam housing and mini dome port, no strobes.

 

Whale sharks, that is.  Big fish.  Really big fish.

It’s the first day of the Wetpixel Whale Shark trip and the sharks did not disappoint.  There were some (but not a ton) of eggs in the water for the sharks to eat.  We saw a few plowing through the water, mouths agape, enjoying the bounty.

It was my first whale shark encounter and wow, it was fun.  It is also amazing how fast they swim.  They don’t look like they’re going very fast.  But it is definitely hard to keep up.  Even with my crazy long fins.  So here are a few pictures from today.  I’m hoping to be a little closer tomorrow and have better shots.

First swim of the day.  And first whale shark shot.  I really should be closer to get better color. Well, more gray anyway.  But even with the fisheye, I’m not sure how I can get close enough to get the color I want and still have the whole fish in the frame.  Did I mention that they’re big?

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This guy was keeping a careful eye on my while he had his snack.  Truer color here — you can see that he’s really gray, not bluish.  But really just the front 1/3 of the shark.

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While there weren’t so many eggs in the water, there was a lot of broken up sargasso seaweed.
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This guy made me work for it. And at the end of the day. Checked off cardio for the day.
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Snorkel site: 20 miles offshore from Isla Mujeres, Mexico

All shot at 1/200th at f/3.5 with Olympus OMD EM5, 8mm Panasonic fisheye lens in Nauticam housing and mini dome port, no strobes.

 

After disappointing weather at the outset that had us all shooting macro, the sun came out and with it, the color on the reef.  Here’s a shot from the top of a site called G6. Really liked that site. Look at all that color. All those fish. The glimpse to the pretty blue through the “window.”

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Dive site: G6

1/250th at f/8.  Shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 8mm Panasonic fisheye lens, Nauticam housing and mini dome port, 2 Sea & Sea strobes.

 

Here’s an expectant anemone fish guarding its eggs. These eggs are very close to hatching. If you look closely, you can see the eyes of the baby fish. The parent comes out from the anemone not only to chase away potential predators, but also to aerate the eggs by blowing water over them.

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Dive site: Pinnacle

1/250th at f/5.6.  Shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 60mm Olympus f/2.8 macro lens, Nauticam housing and flat port, 2 Sea & Sea strobes.

 

We’ll get back to all that crazy color a little later.

But for now, here’s an up close and personal encounter with a little hawkfish (dwarf, I think).  Under a little ledge, looking back at me.  I’m sure hoping that I’d move along.  As you’ll see from the notes below, shot with my macro lens which definitely wasn’t the plan.  All that color from yesterday, those big expanses of corals — the plan was for wide angle.  But the weather was lousy.  The visibility was poor.  And so instead of fighting the conditions with a wide angle set up, we all jumped in to do macro instead.

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Dive site: Underwater Fantasy

1/160th at f/11.  Shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 60mm Olympus f/2.8 macro lens, Nauticam housing and flat port, 2 Sea & Sea strobes.

 

I just got back from another great underwater photography workshop with Alex Mustard, this time in Fiji.  Despite a few logistical challenges this time and less than perfect weather at the outset, it was still a great trip.  And so very nice to see so many familiar faces too.  Ultimately most important, the diving and photographic opportunities were great.  We all came away with images we were quite pleased with.

And the colors, wow.  The colors are unbelievable in the literal meaning of that word.  But don’t take my word for it.  See for yourself.

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Bright orange anthias swimming out from the bright pink, yellow and magenta soft corals.

Dive site: Instant Replay

1/250th at f/8.  Shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 8mm Panasonic fisheye lens, Nauticam housing and mini dome port, 2 Sea & Sea strobes.

 

This fine gentleman (the one on the top in the picture) works for tips.  The guy on the bottom works for fish.

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At least 2 things would concern me a little.  1) the flavor of the bait fish and 2) the incisors.  Especially the incisors.  Clearly they’ve both been doing this for a while.  But not sure I’d be interested in trying it.

Harbor near Cape Town.

Olympus OMD EM5, 75mm f/1.8.