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Tag Archives: eggs

I love diving at Molokini. The water is clear. There’s lots to see. And you often get to see whales and dolphins on the way there and/or at your surface interval.  This week didn’t disappoint.  We saw whales every day.  Lazing about at the surface.  Spouting.  Diving.  Breaching.  And coolest, mothers holding their new babies up at the surface with their noses.  (The new calves need assistance in the early going.)

I’m not alone in my love of Molokini, of course. Lots of people love it. Often you hear that the back wall is just *the* best. Personally, I like the far corner (say, Reef’s End) best. But ok, I’ll slum it on the back wall.

Poking around in a crack, I found these this pair of pipefish.

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There are no fish that I don’t like. (Well, maybe with the possible exception of the territorial, bitey Titan Triggerfish.  I give them wide berth.) But I especially like seahorses and their relatives.  Pipefish are essentially straightened out seahorses.

They are shy.  These guys were down in a crack.  And they’re nervous.  They never stop moving.  Combined with their length, that makes them hard to shoot — it’s hard to keep them all in focus.  And with all that movement and in their challenging location, hard to focus on them.  So, these shots aren’t really technically “right”.  But I like them anyhow.

And by the way, did you notice that he was pregnant?  (Yep, like other seahorses, the males brood the babies.)  Hard to tell in that shot.  But in this one, you can see the eggs glued on the stomach.

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Dive site: Maui – Molokini Back Wall.

Shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 12-50 at 50mm f/8.0, 1/250th, ISO 200.

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Here’s an expectant anemone fish guarding its eggs. These eggs are very close to hatching. If you look closely, you can see the eyes of the baby fish. The parent comes out from the anemone not only to chase away potential predators, but also to aerate the eggs by blowing water over them.

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Dive site: Pinnacle

1/250th at f/5.6.  Shot with Olympus OMD EM5, 60mm Olympus f/2.8 macro lens, Nauticam housing and flat port, 2 Sea & Sea strobes.

 

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Musical accompaniment.

Transparent shrimp with eggs.

And since somewhere along the way the metadata is getting stripped, all of these shots are with Olympus OM-D EM-5 with the 12-50mm lens in macro mode (at 43mm) in a Nauticam housing. One Sea & Sea YS-100alpha strobe.

Lembeh, October 2013

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Two banded pipefish, with eggs.

Lembeh, October 2013